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Flagler Beaches Persistent Erosion Problems

Canon

New member
:) Just curious if anyone knows if the new inlet south of matanzas has been named yet? If not can I name it?
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

am I missing somthing, What new inlet ?
 

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Itchey

Googlemeister
Re: New Inlet

Root about 1/2 mile south of matanzas inlet on the old Summer Haven Road the Ocean has breached the beach and cut through to the Summer Haven River. A homeowner there on the north side of the breach has been able to install a rock jetty to protect his home for the time being. However I do not think he stands much of a chance for long term survival.
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That spit of land just above the words skypic.com is now gone and most of the river is actually filling in with sand. Yes they pumped at millions of dollars of expense a ton of beach sand up there about 3 years ago and mother nature is putting it all back!

If you have not been to Summer Haven recently (3-4 months) then it is now very different.

Probably the biggest reason for this breach is that the Army Corps of Engineer's around 20 years ago diverted the flow of the Matanzas River by installing a granite jetty to the south of Fort Matanzas which is on Rattlesnake Island. The jetty was placed to stop erosion of Rattlesnake Island and thus ensure that we would not lose Ft. Matanzas a National Monument.

Well Newton is proved right again ....(For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction)

Please note the pic above is probably from around 2005
 

C-Man

Member
Re: New Inlet

Sand-taker-Inlet
 

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Brenda

New member
Re: New Inlet

We never go down there. We always take to boat out of St. Augustine. That inlet is scary to navigate.
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

I nominate it to be ROOT's Inlet
in Honor of the launch of Crackercoast.com
 

pcgailc

New member
Re: New Inlet

I have said all along that developing a new Inlet in Flagler County would be a boon to our local economy! The one thing that could turn this unemployment situation around. We could develop an inlet, build marinas, restaurants, a Nature Science Center, and more! Maybe this is it! ( smiles )

How about:

Summer Coast Inlet?

Flagler Sands Inlet?

Hammock Dunes Inlet?

Economy Haven Inlet?

lets do it!
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
Re: New Inlet

I agree that a "Navigable Inlet" in Flagler would be 1 heck of an economic boon to Flagler County and in actuality the lack of 1 is in all likelihood the main factor that has stunted economic growth in this area -vs- St. Augustine & Daytona.

The St. Johns River Inlet in Jacksonville with its depth and size is probably the reason for Jacksonvilles Industrial Development over St. Augustine's even though St. Augustine had many years head start.

I am not familiar with anyone/anywhere that has made an artificial inlet into the Atlantic Ocean from scratch, however it is an interesting proposal, which may have very many solid economic prospects. At the same time would be able to offer recreation to its residents and enhance their quality of life here at the same time.

This even though I suspect would be very expensive, may actually pay dollar for dollar more than economic incentives that have been given to private business's in an effort to lure them here or keep them.

The width of the intracoastal here is another problem that would have to be addressed as well as setting aside waterfront property for commercial/industrial use that Flagler does not have.

There also could be some solid benefits as to the jetty's effect in stopping beach erosion along its immediate area, however usually it's good for that area but can increase erosion further up and down the line.

I think it is an interesting enough concept in the beginning that our local governments working together would have a shot at some large backing at both the state and federal levels for additional funding.
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

We should dredge it and create a port, we could use the sand to replenish the beaches down to Flagler beach.

It would be a fantastic expense but I think it would be an important Economic asset and man-made made "natural asset" that we could Draw upon forever, come to think of it the project could possible be engineered to produce power as well. and with the right sea gates provide some protection from storm surge.

Can you Imagine taking control of the water ways and creating a public transportation system via the Canals and water taxis like Venice ???


This would get lots of federal dollars and the Jobs would be a real economic stimulus as well as creating a continuous asset for the county .

we could cover those dad gum toe stubbing rocks too and I might get in the water in high tide.
 

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pcgailc

New member
Re: New Inlet

A working port in Flagler would fill all of the hotels, you could almost guarantee that the Tourist Development Council would grant their monies to help make this happen.


It would turn Flagler County into a Vacation /Sportsman/ Fishing/ Golfing /ecotourism hotspot that would increase everyone's property values, get the money rolling in the restaurant business here, and create a huge influx of people with means to make this county great!
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

As much as I hate the population boom This is exactly what it will take in order for this city to flourish and support itself
 

Canon

New member
Re: New Inlet

Wow, it was just a question about a name! you guys have come up with some good ideas. But, we should probably leave Mother Nature alone and let her do her thing.
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
Re: New Inlet

It has been done already!!!
Lake Worth Inlet just north of Palm Beach is a man made Inlet.
Course that was before Sea Turtles but it is a start.
800pxLake_Worth_Inlet_aerial_view-1.jpg


South Lake Worth Inlet was originally constructed primarily as a measure to improve the declining water quality in the Lake Worth Lagoon. At that time it was also deemed necessary for shippingand transportation. Prior to construction of the South Lake Worth Inlet, the Legislature of Floridacreated a special taxing district (the South Lake Worth Inlet District) whose Board ofCommissioners was authorized to construct and maintain an inlet. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a permit for construction of the inlet in 1924 and construction commenced in 1925. After completion of the jetties and the channel bulkhead, the final cut opening the lagoon to the ocean was made in March 1927. The original channel was approximately 130 feet wide and averaged 8 feet deep. Soon after the initial opening of the inlet,sand impounded on the north jetty began to spill into the channel and form a large flood shoalinside the lagoon. The impounded sand along the north jetty and the formation of the flood shoalled to erosion on the south side of the inlet and consequently the construction of a 2,000-foot longseawall known as the “McCormick wall” in 1932. Soon after, a series of groins were built in front of the seawall by the same property owner in an attempt to protect the seawall from undermining

more: (Click the html at the site the pdf errored on me)
http://74.125.113.132/search?q=cach...+Worth+Inlet+history&cd=6&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us
 

pcgailc

New member
Re: New Inlet

If the area is breached anyways, I think that it would be a fantastic plan to develop it so that the future erosion can be managed in a predictable way.

Flagler County can use this natural resource and Inlet to bring it back onto it's feet and succeed!

People with Big Boats, will suddenly be Very interested in buying property here. It will also become a stop along the way for ocean travelers. The economic boon would be very welcome!

I would rather my tax money go to a project like this, than any desalination project!
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

Hey the main reason they are wanting us to conserve water is so they can move more people in.
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
Re: New Inlet

If the area is breached anyways, I think that it would be a fantastic plan to develop it so that the future erosion can be managed in a predictable way.

Flagler County can use this natural resource and Inlet to bring it back onto it's feet and succeed!

People with Big Boats, will suddenly be Very interested in buying property here. It will also become a stop along the way for ocean travelers. The economic boon would be very welcome!

I would rather my tax money go to a project like this, than any desalination project!

Gail that breech is still in St. Johns County it is north of Marineland and the Summer Haven River which it feeds into has always been more of a tidal marsh than a river. The breech is pumping tons and tons of sand into that area and filling in most of it.

I am curious to see what happens this weekend when a slight storm surge and waves generated by Hurricane Bill begin to attack that area especially as the storm is predicted to be so far off shore, but surf forecasts are 7-9 feet. The direction of the swell will also change as the storm moves from south to center and then north of the area.

Another thing to consider is that our intracoastal waterway portion is pretty narrow, and its only out falls so far are Matanzas Inlet, way way north, and Ponce Inlet even farther south. When this area is inundated with rain it takes longer for flood waters to receed due to the distance it has to travel.

I would think a prime area for an inlet may actually be farther south, maybe even as far south as the area around Gamble Rogers Park. Of course then the tidal rise and fall will likely be a little higher and lower than it curently is in this area but I would expect it not to be much more than 6" or so during normal conditions.

I see a definet economic boom for the idea, as well as there could be some ecological benefits if managed well that would occur at the same time. There would be more frequent and through "Flush's" of the I.C.W. in this area which could allow things like shellfish beds to gather more nutrients, and less pollution.

Local Fishing and Boat business's woould definetly be economically enhanced and after-all We have a major player in the recreational boating industry based right here. (See-Ray)

Local fishstocks would naturally be supplemented by offshore migratory species (Like FLOUNDER who spawn off shore). Also this area has a large portion of coquina rock right near the surface (Marineland Beach and South). Cutting an inlet there would allow a more solid base than areas with just sand beach's. It is still a giant project, however not only possible but plausible as well.
 

Stumpy McDugal

Cracker OG
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

It was only a matter of time for that area to be breached. Most of the homes there are vacant, with a few holdouts. Living there during high tide must be interesting.
 

happyfeet

New member
Re: New Inlet

Yes. At low tide you can bike across it. The house surrounded by rocks can not possibly have insurance.

Root! you made a spot for us marineland folks! Love it.
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

I have always wanted that space ship house for a weekend beach hut.
I would never live on the beach but Id love to have a bamboo shack that I wouldn't worry about blowing away. so I could spend a few days at a time there.
 

Brenda

New member
Re: New Inlet

I have always wanted that space ship house for a weekend beach hut.
I would never live on the beach but Id love to have a bamboo shack that I wouldn't worry about blowing away. so I could spend a few days at a time there.

That would be awesome!
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
Re: New Inlet

Rode through there at high tide on Monday...
Now the breach is in 2 different places along that section.
The summer haven River is changing completely and does not appear to be happy with any of the routes chosen to far.
I think the Army Corps of Engineer's forgot a little phenomenon known as hydraulics.
This winter should prove very interesting indeed
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

attachment.php

Is it really new? or is it a reopening of this historic maps El penon Inlet ?
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
Re: New Inlet

Had never seen a map with El Penon Inlet before today...
Roughly by scale it is in close proximity to where the new break is, however there are many details missing that exist today. Namely the ICW channel that runs west of the Matanzas inlet and makes Summer Island. The altered look of Rattlesnake Island today due to the breakwater jetty installed by the Army Corps of Engineers to Protect Rattlesnake Island and Fort Matanzas has altered the current flows significantly.
 

Armando

New member
Re: New Inlet

How about "El-Stupido Inlet" for people actually wanting to build homes on such a fragile piece of property that could easily become a new inlet or flooded by a hurricane? Developers should not be allowed to build on property like that!
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

http://www.augustine.com/history/matanzas/matanzas-inlet.php

early as 1569 a wooden watchtower with a thatched hut was built at Matanzas Inlet. Built to serve only as a lookout, it had no armament. These wooden watchtowers had to be rebuilt or replaced often in Florida's warm, wet climate.
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Governor Manuel de Cendoya visited the Matanzas watchtower on August 21st, 1671, and the occasion was recorded in an affidavit which also gave a description of the watchtower. This drawing was made centuries later from the early description.

Location of the Inlet

Many scholars have debated the exact location of the slaughter of the French. Over the years, heavy storms have been known to open new inlets and close existing ones. It is well documented that an inlet called El Penon was located a few miles south of the present Matanzas Inlet at the time of the massacre. Spanish maps drawn at about this time name this southern inlet "Little Inlet", "Little Matanzas Inlet", "Ribault's Inlet", as well as "El Penon Inlet".
With nearly 250 people having been killed, it would seem that something would have been found over the years that would give clues to the exact location of the site. However, no such archaeological evidence has ever been found.
The National Park Service does have a copy of a deposition given by a man who, as a boy, played in the area. According to him, after the hurricane of 1893, the beach was washed away, exposing a large number of human bones. The writer of the deposition suggested that these were the bones of the French soldiers killed by Pedro Menendez in 1565. However, other people conjecture that these bones, if actually seen, were more likely from burial grounds of Native Americans who had lived in the area for many centuries.

Watch Towers and
Suprise Attacks


St. Augustine was vulnerable to attack through its "back door." All one needed do was enter the Matanzas River at the Matanzas Inlet, sail north until reaching the San Sebastian River, surprising the city from the rear.
Realizing this, by 1569 the Spanish had built wooden watchtowers along the shore to watch for ships heading towards the city and alert the military of their presence. Such a tower was built at the Matanzas Inlet.
Construction was simple. Poles were anchored into the ground and a platform built at the top of the poles from which a sentry could scan the ocean for any ship approaching from the south. A small thatch- roofed hut was built at the base of the tower, and both tower and hut were enclosed in a palm log stockade. If a ship were sighted, a man would either run or row the fifteen miles (24 km) from Matanzas to St. Augustine to alert the garrison at the larger fort there. The watchtower was manned by perhaps 4-5 men and had no artillery.
In 1683 a band of pirates captured the Matanzas tower and made plans to capture St. Augustine. However when they advanced north they became lost, and opted for an overland approach. They were met and defeated by the Spanish at El Vergel (Fish Island), and the city was saved.
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Re: New Inlet

The Changing Landscape of Matanzas
Barrier Islands move. After all, they are made of sand and are shaped by wind and waves.
Currents move along the east coast of Florida from the north to the south. These currents gradually wear away the north end of the islands and deposit the sand at the south end, where the tidal current moving out through the inlet, between two barrier islands, stops the flow of the longshore current. Storms, especially hurricanes and nor'easters, pound the shoreline, sometimes making new inlets or over-washing the island. Tidal currents often form hooks and sandbars at inlets where there are no jetties or seawalls.
This is what has happened at the Matanzas Inlet, the only "natural" inlet left on the east coast of Florida. The inlet is not dredged or marked. There are no groins or jetties, and the sand comes and goes as nature wills. Every year the hook on the inside of the inlet grows a little, and the island creeps south.
We know by comparing charts from the present time with those from the mid-1700s that over the past two and a half centuries, Anastasia Island has "migrated" south, moving the inlet about 1/2 mile (650 meters) south of where it was when Fort Matanzas was built in 1740-1742. Standing on the gun deck of Fort Matanzas, a soldier would be looking directly out into the ocean. (See drawings below)
It's a part of nature for these islands to move. Often, however, people try to control the movement of barrier islands by building jetties at inlets or piers or groins vertical to the shore. These might catch the sand drifting down from the north, but then the shoreline south of the jetty is starved for sand and begins to wash away. This is what is happening at the north end of Anastasia Island and what happened at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina making it necessary to move the lighthouse as the ocean washed closer.

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Brenda

New member
Re: New Inlet

How about "El-Stupido Inlet" for people actually wanting to build homes on such a fragile piece of property that could easily become a new inlet or flooded by a hurricane? Developers should not be allowed to build on property like that!

LMAO! Too Funny!
 

Canon

New member
Re: New Inlet

I was up there today and the I let was flowing well, carving it's way through the landscape!
 

TailTeaser

Chum Churner
Flagler Beach's Persistent Erosion Problems

FLAGLER BEACH -- There's more to seaside sand than meets the eye -- or sticks to the skin -- and there are concerns that Flagler County's sand isn't sticking.
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To the beach, that is.

Creating a feasibility study to protect the shoreline and replace the tiny grains lost to storms takes time -- a lot of time, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The corps is in the sixth year of a 20-year study of Flagler's beaches.

And while local officials in July agreed to continue funding the study, Commissioner Milissa Holland asked fellow board members earlier this month to reopen discussions about whether it's in taxpayers' best interest.

The study's revised estimated cost of $3.52 million, to be split about 50-50 between the county and the federal government, is more than double the price tag from when the study began in 2004.

But it's not a simple process, coastal experts say. Replacement sand must be deemed functional when it comes to beach renourishment, said Charles Finkl, president of the Coastal Education and Research Foundation and a professor in the department of geo-sciences at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

According to Finkl, state law requires replacement sand to be "similar," a term coastal engineers often debate. It typically speaks more to grain size than any other attribute because size affects the shore slope and washout rate, he said.

"The whole process is watched very closely," he said. "The beach is the main resource of the state (Florida). The Bureau of Beaches and Coastal Processes (an office of the Department of Environmental Protection) isn't going to allow just anything on the beach. The Corps is constrained by state law."

Much of Florida's beach sand is made up of quartz crystals that are washed into the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico from land masses such as the Appalachian mountains, according to myflorida.com -- Florida's official website. Depending on local geographical characteristics, the quartz crystals mix with coral, limestone, shell and other organic matter to create sand and give it color and texture.

COLORFUL COQUINA

The distinctive orange-colored sand on most of Flagler's beaches comes from the Anastasia Formation, according to information from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. It's an orange-brown coquina consisting of whole and fragmented mollusk shells in a matrix of sand, cemented by calcite.

"There are special problems in Flagler because of the Anastasia Formation," Finkl said, adding there is little sand coverage in the area. "The beach is right on top of it. The sand isn't as thick as most people think it is and when there's erosion, it cuts into the formation."

Volusia's beaches also sit on top of the underlying formation, but, because there is more sand coverage, erosion hasn't cut into the Anastasia, Finkl said.

"At the thickest, the sand is 6 feet deep (in Volusia County)," he said. "There's much less in Flagler, so you are seeing the eroded formation (mixed with quartz crystals)."

Cindy Colangelo, manager of the Topaz Hotel on State Road A1A in Flagler Beach, said she'd rather not see a different type of sand added to the beach, even if it meets the criteria of being similar in size.

"I've never really heard anyone say they had a preference, but if you're coming to Flagler, you're coming for the beach. There's nothing else here," she said. "It's the most beautiful beach with all the colors and tones. It's quiet and relaxing."

Daytona Beach resident and grand master sand sculptor Suzanne Altamare has a different take on the local sands.

"There was a time when Daytona Beach sand was perfect," she said, "but we've had a big intrusion of that orange big-grain sand. I like fine-grain sharp sand. The best sand in Florida now is Fort Myers."

EVEN TURTLES AFFECTED

Size, color and texture affect more than sculpt-ability. It changes a beach's character, said Tom Campbell with Coastal Planning and Engineering in Boca Raton. A darker color makes for a hotter beach -- and that can affect the gender of loggerhead turtles, he said.

"This is very important, because you don't want to change the nesting behaviors of the turtles that come up onto the beach," Campbell said.

The "cross-shore" shape and slope -- from the dunes to the dry beach to deep underwater -- affects how waves break, Campbell said.

That's important to Flagler Beach resident and surfer Tommy Duncan, 39. Duncan said he's seen changes in surf conditions in the few years he's been in the area, but he wouldn't change a thing.

"The bar is a little messed up," he said. "It used to be that full-on high tide was the best time to surf. It used to be the better wave. But now, it's not breaking. Midtide is best now."

Duncan said he believes it's easier for him to adapt to the changes than to alter the beach.

"I don't think you'd want to change the topography," he said. "Mother Nature goes in cycles, so I'd leave her alone."

And, at least where it comes to artificial reefs and permanent man-made structures, Finkl agrees.

"These things have their place," he said, "but it's easy to make a boo-boo. We say we bury our mistakes with sand -- or if you make a mistake with sand, it will eventually correct itself.

"If it's not done right, a permanent structure can make things worse."
 

C~Scape

Well-known member
Re: Coastal experts prefer going with the grain in Flagler

A1A in Flagler Beach is on top of the beach.
Ya think that may be part of the problem?
 

Mamabear

Well-known member
Re: Coastal experts prefer going with the grain in Flagler

Duncan said he believes it's easier for him to adapt to the changes than to alter the beach.

"I don't think you'd want to change the topography," he said. "Mother Nature goes in cycles, so I'd leave her alone."

And, at least where it comes to artificial reefs and permanent man-made structures, Finkl agrees.

"These things have their place," he said, "but it's easy to make a boo-boo. We say we bury our mistakes with sand -- or if you make a mistake with sand, it will eventually correct itself.

"If it's not done right, a permanent structure can make things worse."

Absolutely, 100% agree!
 
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