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June 6 1944 D-Day

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
My Grandmother was 6 months pregnant. From 1941 to 1944 America and its allies pursued the goal of defeating "Germany First." Their strategy rested on a key assumption, ultimately there would have to be a massive invasion of Northwest Europe aimed at the heart of the Axis empire. This would reduce German pressure on the Soviet Union by creating a true "second front" in Europe. Germany would be trapped between the Soviets in the east and the Americans and British in the west.

By 1943 success on the battlefield and production in the factories made it possible to begin formal planning for this bold operation,the largest amphibious invasion in history. The target date was spring 1944.

In Berlin, Hitler understood that an invasion would come. Fortification of the coast of Northwest Europe was already underway. In 1943 its pace accelerated and more troops were posted in the west. The Germans expected the invasion in early 1944. They knew that it would determine the war's outcome. What they did not know was precisely when and where the Allies would strike.
On June 7 1944, the day after 150,000 Allied troops came ashore along the French coastline, The Daily Telegraph declared the D-Day landings to be "the greatest invasion of all time".

According to the front page article, 4,000 ships were taken across the Channel, 10,000 tons of bombs were exploded and 10,000 men battled to sweep away mines from the surrounding waters.

After the invasion, the returning pilots declared the "beaches [were] completely in our hands".

The Telegraph's coverage features a report from the newspaper's special correspondent Cornelius Ryan, who flew from a US Air Force base close by to catch a glimpse of the action.

"I was the last correspondent to fly over the Allied beachhead this evening," he said. "We took off from this base to bomb gun emplacements on the French coast.
"Unlike the earlier missions, we had excellent visibility and could see up and down the Channel for many miles. After we had left the coast I suddenly became aware of hundreds of aircraft which thundered over us forming the area fighter cover.

"The whole sky as far as one could see in any direction was just one mass of aircraft of every type. Below us, their wings glinting in the sunlight, I could see fighters only a few feet down from the water returning to England."
He went on: "Down below, the Channel looked cold and choppy. Away to the west I saw a sight I shall never forget. Hundreds of craft of every kind were moving towards France. From our height they were only distinguishable by the white wash which churned from their sterns.

"They looked as if they were strung together by some invisible chain.

"Away on the horizon another fleet of vessels moved forward. They were all headed the same way -- towards the Allied beachhead."

Another report tells the story of the American four-engined bombers, which were described as "the greatest air armada of the war".

"[The American force] was crossing the East Coast for two hours. Bombers and fighters went out simultaneously in a dozen streams," it said.

"One observer said it was 'like all the heavy day and night attacks of the past few weeks in one.'

"Both R. A. F and American forces were showing their red, green and white navigation lights. The roar of their engines brought people from their beds."

Finally, the 'late news' column on the front page informs readers that the French train service is suspended.

"Paris radio says that train service, except for suburban trains, is suspended between St. Nazaire and Mont Parnasse stations, " it reported.
 
D-Day in Flagler: our veterans' letters

Fifteen Flagler County residents fought in World War II around June 1944. The following letters were compiled by Sisco Deen, Flagler County Historical Society.


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ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
It was a defining moment in America being a stand up nation, These men were real heros, and they were not alone the entire nation acted heroically to supply them.
I just wish we could get the same sort of resolve in the middle east and bring our kids home.
 

Fastcar

Well-known member
It contiues to amaze me how after all the lives lost on foreign soil we continue to attempt to be the worlds cops.
 

Mamabear

Well-known member
I was in NYC at the Statue of Liberty this year. It was a total accident we chose November 6th to be there but I was so glad we did. The ceremony was beautiful. Rose petals were dropped over Liberty as a Fire boat blew red, white, and blue streams of water into the air. Every branch of the service was represented in full dress uniform.

 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
I was in NYC at the Statue of Liberty this year. It was a total accident we chose November 6th to be there but I was so glad we did. The ceremony was beautiful. Rose petals were dropped over Liberty as a Fire boat blew red, white, and blue streams of water into the air. Every branch of the service was represented in full dress uniform.
That must have been wonderful to see. I feel so fortunate and am so proud to be an American--my accident of birth here in America is truly a blessing.
 

VietnamVet

Army Cracker
This should be required viewing by every VA employee no matter the position or grade each and every day before they start work.
 

Mamabear

Well-known member
HPIM1233.JPG

My little camera doesn't do the ceremony justice, but this picture gives you an idea exactly how thickly the rose petals were falling.
 

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