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PC Building Code Help Needed

Stumpy McDugal

Cracker OG
Staff member
For the life of me I can't find the building code on the city's website.

I need to know if I need a permit for a flag pole.

All help appreciated.
 

TailTeaser

Chum Churner
I looked and I couldnt find it either, but I had a neighbor down the street that was complaining about wanting a flag pole and it was gonna be $500 if he went through the city. Not sure how accurate the info is on the price.

So he said screw that and put one up without a permit! Nobody has said anything to him so far.
 

Kotch

Member
My father in law put one up without a permit. It is removable and is not in the yard all the time. Didn't even think about a permit for a flag pole.
 

sundealer

Founder
It's Palm Coast! Of course you need a permit!!!

But just put up the pole. I'd be more worried about the height!
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
You can find it under Signs
http://palmcoastgov.com/Resident/Forms/



12.04.08.
Flagpoles. Flagpoles are allowed subject to the following conditions:
A.One flagpole is allowed on each parcel in the City.

B.Maximum pole height shall be 30 feet in nonresidential districts, and 25 feet in residential districts.

C.All poles shall be ground mounted.

D.All flagpoles shall have a minimum five-foot setback from the property lines.

(Ord. No. 2009-26, §§ 72—78, 12-15-09)


American Flag and Flagpole
According to Florida Statute 720.304 effective July 1, 2011:


Any homeowner may display one portable, removable United States flag or official flag of the State of Florida in a respectful manner, and one portable, removable official flag, in a respectful manner, not larger than 4-1/2 feet by 6 feet, which represents the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard, or a POW-MIA flag, regardless of any covenants, restrictions, bylaws, rules or requirements of the association.


Any homeowner may erect a freestanding flagpole no more than 20 feet high on any portion of the homeowner’s real property, regardless of any covenants, restrictions, bylaws, rules or requirements of the association, if the flagpole does not obstruct sightlines at intersections and is not erected within or upon an easement. The homeowner may further display in a respectful manner from that flagpole, regardless of any covenants, restrictions, bylaws, rules or requirements of the association, one official United States flag, not larger than 4-1/2 feet by 6 feet, and may additionally display one official flag of the State of Florida or the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard, or a POW-MIA flag. Such additional flag must be equal in size to or smaller than the United States flag. The flagpole and display are subject to all building codes, zoning setbacks, and other applicable governmental regulations, including but not limited to, noise and lighting ordinances in the county or municipality in which the flagpole is erected and all setback and locational criteria contained in the governing documents.

The laws relating to the flag of the United States of America are found in detail in the United States Code. Title 4, Chapter 1pertains to the flag; Title 18, Chapter 33, Section 700 regards criminal penalties for flag desecration; Title 36, Chapter 3 pertains to patriotic customs and observances. These laws were supplemented by Executive Orders and Presidential Proclamations.

According to the flag code, no flag should be flown above the United States flag. It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed twenty-four hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.

This is a Permit that includes a flag pole but I don't think that the fees are applicable to a flag pole alone.
http://permits.palmcoastgov.com/Details/2011060156


CODE OF ORDINANCES
City of PALM COAST, FLORIDA

Codified through Ordinance No. 2012-4, enacted May 1, 2012.
(Supp. No. 18)

CODE OF ORDINANCES - CITY OF - PALM COAST, FLORIDA

SUPPLEMENT HISTORY TABLE
CITY OF PALM COAST - CHARTER
CHARTER COMPARATIVE TABLE - LAWS OF FLORIDA
CHARTER COMPARATIVE TABLE - ORDINANCES
PART II - CODE OF ORDINANCES

ORDINANCE DISPOSITION TABLE
STATE LAW REFERENCE TABLE
UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE - CITY OF - PALM COAST, FLORIDA
SUPPLEMENT HISTORY TABLE
PALM COAST UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE
CODE COMPARATIVE TABLE
STATE LAW REFERENCE TABLE



Sec. 12.01. - Generally.
Sec. 12.02. - Sign Permits.
Sec. 12.03. - Exempt and Prohibited Signs.
Sec. 12.04. - General Sign Provisions.
Sec. 12.05. - Permitted Permanent Signs.
Sec. 12.06. - Temporary Signs.
Sec. 12.07. - Variances.
Sec. 12.08. - Appeals to Planning and Land Development Regulation Board.
Sec. 12.09. - Substitution of Noncommercial Speech for Commercial Speech.
Sec. 12.10. - Content Neutrality as to Sign Message (Viewpoint).
Sec. 12.11. - Severability.




Document & Forms
Building
City Clerk
Code Enforcement
Comprehensive Plan
Engineering
Green Team Documents
Land Development Code
Local Business Tax Receipts
Planning
Policies
Recreation & Parks
Stormwater
Stormwater Presentations
Survey
Utility
Utility Customer Service
Volunteering

 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
You might need this, I could not find the specs on the footer and pole either but this should have everything you need.
please let us know how your experience goes.
 

Attachments

  • FP1001-07-_Guide_Specifications_for_the_the_design_of_Metal_Flagpoles.pdf
    2.1 MB · Views: 237

TailTeaser

Chum Churner
Instead of the US Flag, I will be flying a Gonzales Banner.

Hell Yeah!
1.png


The Battle of Gonzales was the first military engagement of the Texas Revolution. It was fought near Gonzales, Texas, on October 2, 1835, between rebellious Texian settlers and a detachment of Mexican army troops.
In 1831, Mexican authorities gave the settlers of Gonzales a small cannon to help protect them from frequent Comanche raids. Over the next four years, the political situation in Mexico deteriorated, and in 1835 several states revolted. As the unrest spread, Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, the commander of all Mexican troops in Texas, felt it unwise to leave the residents of Gonzales a weapon and requested the return of the cannon.
When the initial request was refused, Ugartechea sent 100 dragoons to retrieve the cannon using peaceful means. The soldiers neared Gonzales on September 29, but the colonists used a variety of excuses to keep them from the town, while secretly sending messengers to request assistance from nearby communities. Within two days, up to 140 Texians gathered in Gonzales, all determined not to give up the cannon. On October 1, settlers voted to initiate a fight. Mexican soldiers opened fire as Texians approached their camp in the early hours of October 2. After several hours of desultory firing, Mexican soldiers withdrew.[SUP][1][/SUP]
Although the skirmish had little military significance, it marked a clear break between the colonists and the Mexican government and is considered to have been the start of the Texas Revolution. News of the skirmish spread throughout the United States, where it was often referred to as the "Lexington of Texas". The cannon's fate is disputed. It may have been buried and rediscovered in 1936, or it may have been seized by Mexican troops after the Battle of the Alamo.
 
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