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SHOW PIGS Must read for FFA and 4H exibitors Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV)

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The swine industry is suffering from an infectious disease called Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus or PEDv.

PEDv has killed more than 5 million pigs in the last year. This disease is predominantly in the mid west and north. You can go on line and search PEDv and get as much information as you can to prepare for the show pig investment you will be making.

The long term effects from PEDv have not been determined for pigs that have been infected and survived, such as growth rate, reduced immunity to swine diseases like arthritis, and pneumonia. Pigs may not show clinical signs of PEDv and be a carrier that can infect other pigs.

The safe way is to ask your pig supplier for a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. ALL pigs that entry Florida are required by law to have this certificate. Pigs listed on the certificate must be identified by a USDA federally approved ear tag with the sellers premise ID number and state of origin. Federally approved tags carry the USDA shield. This info can be found on line, by searching Animals Imported into Florida, Fla. Code 5C-3.007. No cert. or ear tag should be a RED flag.

You may call me to discuss at Williams Show Pigs
3816 NW 216th St
Lawtey FL 32058
Bud 904-710-9259.



orcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV)

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has been identified on pig farms in the United States through testing at the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratories. PEDV only affects pigs and poses no risk to other animals or humans. The disease does not pose a risk to food safety, and pork remains completely safe to eat.
Periodically, pigs get diarrhea. Various production diseases are routinely monitored on farms. When illness affects a herd, pig farmers work with veterinarians and diagnostic laboratories to manage those illnesses. Although PEDV is relatively new to the United States, it’s not a new disease. It's widespread in many countries in Europe as well as in China, Korea and Japan. PEDV is not a regulatory/reportable disease and is not trade-restricting. It's a pig-farming-related disease.
“What's important to keep in mind is that PEDV is not a human health issue but rather a pig production disease, and we know that enhanced biosecurity measures are extremely important in containing the virus.”—Dr. Paul Sundberg, National Pork Board vice president of science and technology


The USDA, State Animal Health Officials, the American Association of Swine Veterinarians and veterinarians at the National Pork Board and National Pork Producers Council are actively monitoring this disease and will make recommendations to pig farmers as necessary.
Controlling the Spread of PEDV

Currently there is no vaccine available. Farmers, veterinarians, universities, federal agencies, national and state pork organizations and other experts are working to better understand the disease in order to help farmers prevent it from spreading to their farm. One mitigation strategy that has proven effective over time in fighting pig diseases is a practice called “feedback.” Feedback is an all-natural process that exposes a mother sow to the virus so that the sow can develop immunities to help control diseases like PEDV.
This kind of natural exposure has been used in human medicine and, at the recommendation of veterinarians, animals for decades. Farmers and their veterinarians determine the best method of feedback to help save the lives of the baby pigs threatened with PEDV. For example, diluted feces can be used to expose sows to the disease, allowing them to develop protective immunities that are passed to their piglets via the sow’s milk. Sometimes, the farmer and veterinarian may decide that it’s more effective to use tissues that are incorporated into a mother sow’s feed to achieve the same goal of protecting future pigs. It is used on small and large farms as a natural means of preventing pig diseases that might otherwise cause prolonged suffering and death of piglets less than three weeks of age.
Key points about PEDV:


  • PEDV is NOT a human health issue. Pork remains completely safe to eat.
  • Currently there is no vaccine available to cure or prevent PEDV.
  • PEDV is a pig farming virus only affecting pigs. It poses no risk to other animals, humans or food safety.
  • PEDV is not a new virus; it’s been found in countries worldwide.
  • The USDA, State Animal Health Officials, the American Association of Swine Veterinarians and veterinarians at the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are actively engaged in monitoring and continuing to manage this disease.
  • The National Pork Board’s Board of Directors approved $1,100,000 toward research and communication to better understand the PED virus.
http://porkcares.org/our-practices/caring-for-our-pigs/disease-mitigating-risk
National Pork Board Statement on Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV)

The USDA has confirmed that porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has been identified in the United States for the first time through testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory. This is not a new virus, nor is it a regulatory/reportable disease. Since PEDV is widespread in many countries, it is not a trade-restricting disease, but rather a production-related disease. PEDV may appear clinically to be the same as transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus with acute diarrhea. Producers will need to work with their herd veterinarian with if any TGE-like symptoms appear and as always, maintain strict biosecurity protocols.


  • Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a virus similar to transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE), another disease only affecting pigs. It is not zoonotic, so therefore it poses no risk to other animals or humans. Also, it poses no risk to food safety.
  • PEDV has been identified in the United States in a small number of herds. The virus is not a new virus as it was first recognized in England in 1971. Since then, the disease has been identified in a number of European countries, and more recently in China, Korea and Japan.
  • USDA, State Animal Health Officials, the American Association of Swine Veterinarians and veterinarians at the National Pork Board are actively monitoring this disease and will make recommendations to producers as necessary.
  • PEDV is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and may appear to be the same as transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus with acute diarrhea within 12 to 36 hours of onset. Herd veterinarians remain well versed in managing TGE-like diseases.
  • Laboratory testing is the only way to diagnose PEDV.
  • As always, producers who see any signs of illness in their pigs should notify their herd veterinarian immediately to address the issue.
  • PEDV does not affect pork safety. Pork remains completely safe to eat.
The latest Checkoff-funded resources and research on PEDV can be found at www.pork.org/pedv.

The National Pork Board has the responsibility for Checkoff-funded research, promotion and consumer information projects and for communicating with pork producers and the public. Through a legislative national Pork Checkoff, pork producers invest $0.40 for each $100 value of hogs sold. The Pork Checkoff funds national and state programs in advertising, consumer information, retail and foodservice marketing, export market promotion, production improvement, technology, swine health, pork safety and environmental management. For information on Checkoff-funded programs, pork producers can call the Pork Checkoff Service Center at (800) 456-7675 or check the Internet at pork.org.
 
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