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Wanna see my Stiguini?

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
My latest Totem, Inspired by the one found submerged in the st John's , after I learned of it a few years back I have been contemplating the simplistic elegance of the original and back in July I had to fell a dead Pine that was big enough and acted out with the chain saw . It was meant to just be a sketch of the primary cuts I had been mulling on, the tree was already spaultedand riddled with boring insects, so it wasn't a tough cutting process, I figured it would just end up being fire pit fodder, but I liked it so well I had to come up with a way to preserve it more than the 2 years it might've gotten raw. so I put the entire foot log in a bag and plasticined it with Acrylic, it soaked up 5 gallons without a drop of waste. Then I got creative and used a couple of cans of HF bedliner to coat it. it has been mounted off the ground with a solid rod that should resist many years of wind and corrosion. if anyone is having trees removed, I'd love to have the trunks as whole as possible I can move 10 to 12 foot by 3foot round logs and bigger to use for carving, live oak, cypress cherry maples cedar are highly prized and I'm back on my game with producing some un commissioned art for whimsical reasons. 20191216_162440.jpg
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ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
So I just randomly searched again for other sources and found this source of the legend( yeah I'm up late, listening to a set of lectures on myth in human history and j u st got to my favorites, the tricksters )this is close to how I recalled from my youth as relayed by the medicine man at Indian church.
First time I heard about the repeating the name. ,but I suppose I have already appropriated medicine man title with the wheel. This was a really scary story for an 8 year old, but used frequently along with Bigfoot as the milder alternative.
Link http://www.native-languages.org/morelegends/stikini.htm
Name: Stikini
Tribal affiliation: Seminole
figures in other tribes: Cipelaq (Maliseet), Big Owl (Apache)

The Stikini are sinister monsters from Seminole folklore. Originally they were evil witches, who transformed themselves into owl-beings. By day they still resemble Seminole people, but by night, they vomit up their souls (along with all their internal organs) and become undead owl-monsters that feed on human hearts. In some Seminole communities speaking their name is thought to put you at risk for turning into one, so Stikini stories are only told by certain medicine people. In other communities, they have been spoken of more casually as bogeymen to frighten children.

I haven't gotten any hankering for coronary caserole yet so I guess the totem is working to ward off bad spirits, the crows are pretty vocals about it some days while pissing off the red tail that eats my gold fish. Hmm link didn't transfer? Good night
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
I kinda like the way it looked in the raw
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Here's the original pre-contact at that inspired me to carve it. Found in the St Johns river on the bank of Hontoon Island and Now housed at Ft. Caroline ...... ergh I'll post later from another device.
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Can't help but wonder when 250 years from now, some chick from Venus wanders through the neighborhood and finds your stiguini and the stories she will tell her and her husband from Mars' children what its purpose was for "back in the day."

ROOT, you are a man of many talents!
 
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