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Watch Bald Eagle Family on Live Cam

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Harriet laid the second egg today! If all goes well. There will be new eaglets during Christmas week!
 
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KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
In 5-8 days we should have two brand new hatched eaglets. Here’s hoping that there are two healthy hatches!

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KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
At 4 hours old, Little E12...saying, Feed Me!

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(think of "Feed me, Seymour" in Little Shop of Horrors)

 
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KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
E13 is on its way! A pip in the shell was confirmed yesterday afternoon...come on baby, bust out of that shell and join your sibling!
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
E13 made its way into the world last night...dad feeding both little bobble heads. So precious, I love this nest and Mom and Dad and their eaglets. They are perfect parents...many could take lessons on how to care for and raise their young from these two.

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KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
I think Dad made a shopping trip to someone's grill...or a plate with steaks on it sitting waiting to be put on a grill...

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KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
E12 fledged for the first time this afternoon at 79 days old! It was a perfect flight from the attic of the nest tree and making a perfect landing on a snag in the pasture where she stayed for about 15 minutes. She (she is the largest of the two eaglets, so it is assumed E12 is a female) flew back to the nest tree landing right in front of the camera and then dropped down to the nest.

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E12 on snag.jpg
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
E13's first fledge caught by the lady that is at the nest most mornings and provides a constant stream of videos and commentary on the magnificent bald eagle family...

It is at the beginning of the video and was a great flight and return to the nest tree. These E's are flying machines to be sure!!!

 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Could this be a result of lead poisoning? So sad...


This is the result of lead poisoning... It is incredibly sad and so unnecessary and mostly preventable.


It is not my intention to turn this into a political discussion; but, if you don't already know this I think everyone who enjoys wildlife and all of God's creatures should be aware that one of the very first acts that the Trump administration took after the inauguration was to lift the regulation that banned lead bullets and fishing gear that hunters and others who shoot firearms and fish on wildlife refuges and Federal lands because it poisons the wildlife that live on these lands when they eat food that has been contaminated by bullets that fishing gear that contains lead. This is in no way to suggest that I oppose hunting and fishing, I do not.

Seeing that magnificent Bald Eagle suffering neurological issues because of this is unconscionable. Bullets and fishing gear can be manufactured without using lead, it is not necessary and takes nothing from those who enjoy hunting and fishing to not endanger the wildlife that share these lands with humans. This is so preventable!

I realize that it will require some effort and expense on the manufacturer of these goods to change how they make these items; but, does that mean they should not have to change? Should paint manufactures have been able to continue using lead in their paints because it was costly to make the change? When something is discovered to be bad for the environment or life of humans or animals, birds or fish shouldn't it be corrected? You can go to prison and be fined up to $100,000 for having in your possession a single American Bald Eagle feather, shouldn't the manufacturer and users of items that poison them be just as accountable?

Right is right and wrong is wrong, and it is just that simple to me.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-i ... SKBN16930Z
I did remember posting about this back when it happened. I just couldn't find the thread. I see that what was once in the Husbandry forum is now here in Rainbows and Unicorns. Anyway, I am really sad that the current administration saw fit to do this, and sorta makes their claim of a lack of patriotism ring hollow in relationship with the "taking a knee" during the National Anthem. To me it seems as if it was more important to undo an Obama action than it is to protect the National Symbol and the lives of America's Bald Eagle population.

Here is a picture of the latest SW Florida bald eagle family of Harriet, M15, and this years eaglets E12 & and E13 shortly before the eaglets left on their own eagle adventures. I pray that they never have an encounter with deadly lead ammunition and fishing gear.

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KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
The 8th season of the Florida SW Eagle Cam, home of Harriet and M15 and their offspring has gone live with 4 different cams operating. One of the cams is a 360-degree cam which the viewer controls. This will be my 4th season of watching these beautiful eagles. They have brought me much joy and I have learned a lot about our National symbol, the magnificant Bald Eagle.

Provided for your viewing pleasure. Any questions, please just ask ... I will help where I can.

https://www.dickpritchettrealestate.com/eagle-feed.html

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WVaKay

Well-known member
Thanks for sharing Kathy. We used to see a bald eagle and nest when walking along the intracoastal waterway, long ago. Bit I can still see them in my mind.
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
From the CAM today, the beautiful Harriet and the most attentive M15. The bald eagles mate for life unless one of the pair dies or goes missing, they will take another mate. The male takes care of the female during the nesting season while she sits on the eggs. He will bring her food, maybe an air plant or pine bough which Harriet seems to love as she will often bring one to the nest herself. The male also takes his turn on tending to the eggs to give the female a much needed break. They will work on reinforcing and growing the nest over the next few weeks. Normally Harriet lays her eggs during mid-November with the eggs hatching during Christmas week. Of course, I am sure this timetable could change a bit, but that has been my experience since I started watching the nest. It usually takes 35 days for the eggs to hatch.

 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Season 8 begins and the beautiful Harriet and handsome M15 watch over their domain.

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There are four live CAMs this season with sound.

 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Eggs should be laid within the next 3 weeks. This is such an incredible and beautiful pair of Bald Eagles. Harriett and M15 about to start the 8th season on the Pritchett sponsored Eagle Cam in Fort Myers, FL. If you don't look in on these magnificent creatures once in a while during the nesting season you are missing out big time.


Incredible Harriett and M15.jpg
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
From this Facebook member who photos and makes videos of Harriett and M15 almost daily throughout the nesting season

Wskrsnwings

· 11 hrs · Edited ·


Harriet was 'sleeping'... and she shows us how eagles and other birds sleep..."Usually birds are ‘half-asleep’ – and birds choose which half dozes. Birds that are literally half-asleep - with one brain hemisphere alert & the other snoozing - control which side of the brain remains awake. The brain hemispheres take turns sinking into the sleep stage characterized by slow brain waves. The eye controlled by the sleeping hemisphere shuts, while the wakeful hemisphere's eye stays open and vigilant. This has only been found in birds and some aquatic mammals such as dolphins, whales, seals, and manatees.
Source Ornithology author Frank B. Gill: Birds exhibit three stages of sleep: slow-wave sleep, or SWF; intermediate sleep; and rapid-eye-movement sleep, or REM (as in mammals). Slow-wave sleeping requires the use of only one side of the brain at a time, a primary feature of bird sleep (Kavanau 1996; Rattenborg et al. 1999). This so-called unihemispheric sleep has been observed in 29 bird species belonging to 13 orders. Birds typically close their eyes when they sleep, but just one eye at a time for unihemispheric sleep. Unihemispheric sleep enables continued vigilance. Thus, an apparently sleeping duck watches for predators with one eye open and sleeps with the other eye closed. REM sleep takes place with both eyes closed. Very short and frequent bouts of REM sleep are a feature of sleep in the birds. Quick bouts of REM sleep combined with (one-eyed) unihemispheric sleep enable birds such as Scooty Terns and swifts to sleep on the wing."

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