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Question Were Can I Buy Potatoes ?

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
So I keep wondering when do our potato farmers plant potatoes and when do they plant cabbage
And when is the normal harvest time for these local crops?

I would like to be sure to get a 100lbs of new potatoes this year but more important I would like to know what the optimal Local planting and growing times are. My Grandpa always planted potatoes on St Patricks day and harvest was later in the spring unless we had lots of rain and there was a chance of rot. But it seems like one might be able to plant taters here any time now for a spring harvest?

This is not just to aggravate Dee Its a question I have been meaning to ask:smartass:
 

Little Dee

Sweet & Sassy
If you had 2 potatoes, how do you know which one is the prostitute?????????



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ITS THE ONE MARKED IDAHO!!!!
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
Cabbage will be going in the ground shortly with cutting in Feb-March.
Potatoes also get planted around that same time or just a little before and are harvested April - May.
You don't see many Florida potato's on the market because they are primarily "Chip" potato's. Yep Lay's in particular buys (guessing here) 85-90% of the local crop for what will eventually return to us in their shiny plastic bags, all lathered in oil and flavorings!

As a side note... Florida Potato's don't last long in our humidity...You can usually get them at the County line produce stand, or if you drive into Palatka or from St. Augustine over toward Palatka then you will see a few vendors along the highway (SR 207). If I see them available I'll make sure I let you know! Now the Cabbage is another whole story. It is sold to all kinds of grocery chains and it is easy to tell. It is the largest heads and firmest variety you will find all year long! Just don't get near the fields after they get done cutting and disc the remnants into the ground.....You'll swear you were at "Kim-Chi or Sour Kraut" land the smell keeps even the buzzards away!
 

Mamabear

Well-known member
Fruit/VegJanFebMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptOctNovDec
apples (none in Florida!)
Asian pearsXXXXXX
asparagusXXXX
beansXXXXXXXXXX
blackberriesXX
blueberriesXXXX
broccoliXXXXXXXXXX
cabbageXXXXXXXXXX
cantaloupesXXXXXX
cherriesXXXX
Christmas treesXX
cucumbersXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
eggplantXXXXXX
greensXXXXXXXXXX
herbsXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
nectarinesXXXXXX
peachesXXXXXX
peasXXX
peppersXXXXXXXX
plumsXXXX
potatoesXXXXXXXX
raspberriesXXXXXXXXX
rhubarbXXXX
pumpkinsXXXX
squashXXXXXXXXXX
strawberriesXXXX
sweet cornXXXXXXXXXX
sweet potatoesXXXX
tomatoesXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
watermelonsXXXXXXXXXX

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Green indicates the range when the crop usually ripens; but be sure to call the farms, as it is just an approximation. Harvest dates can vary dramatically in different seasons and even in different parts of the state.Note: Memorial Day weekend traditionally marks the opening of U-pick blueberry
season in Florida


 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
See Now that's how you know we have some true Florida Crackers.
Great chart Mamma Bear.
We should put together a map of all our local Agricultural resources.
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
Here is the info and phone number for County Line Produce in case anyone wanted to take a trip there.
You will note it says they are closed till November but I don't think that is correct. They used to open in September if I remember right.
Either way you can call first!
County Line Produce
For many, many years, Brad Bland has opened up his farm stand just before Thanksgiving. His farm sits on the border between St. Johns and Putman Counties. The farm stand began 44 seasons ago with the Bland and Mathis boys selling cabbages out of the back of a truck. Customers now come from afar to load up their trucks or cars with his fresh produce. Small white signs string along the road, announcing what is offered on any given day: varieties of cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts on the stem, carrots, beets, Silver Queen corn, and all kind of greens grown using only conventional farming methods. These vegetables and more grow on Brad s 65 acres over the eight months that the stand is open.
Whatever Brad needs to round out his selections including other vegetables, raw honey from Ray Warren in Umatilla, Florida, roasted peanuts, etc., he gets from Plant City and some area farmers. Customers will know what is being grown right on the farm by checking the blackboard which is updated daily.
County Line Produce employs one assistant farmer in the field with Brad Bland and two workers selling produce in the stand. Everything is handpicked with no large machines and equipment. When the temperature begins to rise for the summer, the stand closes. In mid-June expect to see the word “SHUT” written on the covered stand and await the November opening just in time to prepare for Thanksgiving Dinner.
Contact:
9260 State Road 207
Hastings, FL 32145
904-692-9400
Hours:
Open 7 days a week: 8am -4pm
Screen Shot 2013-10-29 at 8.18.12 AM.png
 

palmerbound2005

New member
There is a great produce market on Hwy 100 that sells Flagler potatoes. It's almost to Shell Bluff on the left side as you head toward Palatka. I forget the name, but they are only open on Saturdays. I went there during the Tour de Farm last year and the potatoes were fantastic!
 

TailTeaser

Chum Churner
There is a great produce market on Hwy 100 that sells Flagler potatoes. It's almost to Shell Bluff on the left side as you head toward Palatka. I forget the name, but they are only open on Saturdays. I went there during the Tour de Farm last year and the potatoes were fantastic!
Thanks for the info. We will be checking it out!
 

Itchey

Googlemeister
I just got confirmation that the "County Line Produce" stand on 207 just south of Hastings (see map above) is open! Cash Only no Debit or Credit Cards!
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Cabbage will be going in the ground shortly with cutting in Feb-March.
Potatoes also get planted around that same time or just a little before and are harvested April - May.
You don't see many Florida potato's on the market because they are primarily "Chip" potato's. Yep Lay's in particular buys (guessing here) 85-90% of the local crop for what will eventually return to us in their shiny plastic bags, all lathered in oil and flavorings!

As a side note... Florida Potato's don't last long in our humidity...You can usually get them at the County line produce stand, or if you drive into Palatka or from St. Augustine over toward Palatka then you will see a few vendors along the highway (SR 207). If I see them available I'll make sure I let you know! Now the Cabbage is another whole story. It is sold to all kinds of grocery chains and it is easy to tell. It is the largest heads and firmest variety you will find all year long! Just don't get near the fields after they get done cutting and disc the remnants into the ground.....You'll swear you were at "Kim-Chi or Sour Kraut" land the smell keeps even the buzzards away!
I just came accros this again and was reminded of some wisdom I collected in the interim. I had the opportunity to break bread with a retired potato farmer at cracker day and I had the pleasure of absorbing some of his experience. His answer to my original question was January. I thought February was a little bit late for a frost resistant plant like potatoes. in Oklahoma /Texas it is the wet spring that will mess you up and rot them before they have a chance to mature if you dont dig them early. Onions can have the same issues. I always enjoyed picking up the fresh spuds when they were turned out. But braiding the onions was the real fun project. The memories of that old bed in the root cellar filled with potatoes, dusted like doughnuts with sevin make me shutter to think about what exposure levels I had. Between that and all the other things I had to play with amongst them vials of mercury, lead and all sorts of products used in the oil exploration like soda ash . And the experiments I did prove I have a guardian angel.
 

Jeannie

Founder
When I lived in Maine, I rented the upstairs of a house that rented the fields out to a potato farmer. We used to go and dig some up for dinner.
 
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