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Why What is a cooter?

ROOT

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Glad to see your inquiry was satisfied.
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Catchdog1
Scrub Chicken5
Cooter20
Cracklin100
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Piney-Woods Rooter2500
Scrub cow5000

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ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
[h=1]The Legend Of the Cooter: A Southern-fried fable[/h] One day long, long ago Possum called the animals of what is now Citrus County to a meeting on the banks of Lake Tsala Apopka.

There was a difficulty to be addressed.



“My friends,” Possum said, nervously flicking his skinny, hairless tail back and forth, “we have a problem.
Old Gator has been makin’ a terrible ruckus, and none of us can get a wink of sleep. Somebody needs to go and see what’s wrong.”



“Turtle!” Raccoon exclaimed. “Turtle’s perfect—good at swimmin’, and he’s got a hard shell to protect himself.”



The other animals, fearing Gator’s sharp teeth and sharper hunger, also urged Turtle to go.

Too shy to protest, he swam out to the center of the lake.

There, he saw Gator—big, green and splashing fiercely.

How could he ever confront the beast?



Turtle paddled nearer and was about to ask him what was wrong when, suddenly, Gator lunged at him.
He withdrew into his shell just in time to hide from Gator’s crushing jaws.
Next, he felt himself being lifted upward, then sinking rapidly.



Turtle peeked out of his shell and saw that he was in the great lizard’s belly.
And he saw a sharp spike from a trout’s fin imbedded in the side of Gator’s stomach.
Turtle pulled the spike out, and a great roar resounded around him.
Then he abruptly tumbled out of Gator’s belly and into the lake.


Gator felt so much better that he returned Turtle to shore on his massive back, promising friendship—and quiet—forever.
Turtle’s remarkable bravery received cheers and great praise from all the animals.



“From now on,” Possum said, “we’ll call you ‘Courageous Turtle’.”



“Cooter!” echoed baby Mouse. And that was the name that stuck.

[h=1][/h]
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Its a soft shell turtle that used to be eaten till it was protected.
In north Carolina and elsewhere they still eat snappers
Cooter in the half shell

Cooter is the indigenous snapping turtle, a culinary delight with a nasty attitude. Cooter tastes wonderful and Cooter has seven kinds of meat, so there is reason for everyone to eat mo' Cooter.

Fancy eatin' Cooters are a versatile and as yet undiscovered gourmet food goldmine. Imagine serving up a whole Cooter, right in his own shell. Cooter could be served cooked, of raw, as Cooter sushi, and dished-up in his own shell.

Cooter is mean!

Cooter would be expensive for upscale restaurants because they mean, real food with an nasty attitude. I've seen a Cooter snap a broomstick in half with his powerful jaws, and they are hard to kill, especially when they "tuck-in" and you have to cut them open alive with a saw. The extra cost of dispatching fresh Cooters would add to it's mystique and allow the chef to charge a premium. Properly marketed, I'll bet that Cooter sushi would rival Fugu (the venomous puffer fish that costs $80 per serving) as a rare gourmet treat.


Eatin' Cooter has great sushi potential
 

Tachy

New member
Good eating Cooter: A soft shelled turtle still served by the Yearling Restaurant in Cross Creek.
Not to be confused with Scrub Chicken: Gopher tortoises. Crackers loved to eat them; now it is illegal to kill them.

Other cool words that are still being used by Florida Crackers include:




  • Chitlins: Hog innards, cleaned and cooked.

    Corn Pone: A cake made from cornmeal batter using milk instead of water and deep fried.

    Cracker Horse: A small horse descended from the herds that the Spaniards brought over in the early 1500's. They evolved into surefooted herding animals used by the Florida cowhunters.
    Croker Sack: A burlap bag.
    Fat Back: Fatty meat from a hog's back. Cut up in small pieces to flavor beans and greens. Also used to make lard. Also can be roasted crispy and eaten like popcorn.
    Grits: This is a southern staple made from dry coarse ground corn. Never served as a cereal, and not hominy grits Yankees eat. The Civil War would have ended much sooner if the Confederate Army had run out of grits.
    Hominy: Whole grains of white corn soaked in lye and boiled.
    Perloo: A one dish meal of meat and rice cooked together, like shrimp perloo. Yankees call it pilau. Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings has her favorite perloo recipe in her "Cross Creek Cookbook".

    Pineywoods Rooter: A feral hog, good to eat. Crackers like to trap them, pen them and fatten them up with corn before killing them for food.Pull: To take a drink of liquor from a bottle or jug. As in "take a pull of this shine".
    Swamp Cabbage: The heart of Sabal palm, cut into chunks and boiled. A cracker delicacy.

    Varmit: Any small animal like a rat, rabbit, or other varmint or vermin.
 

ROOT

Administrator
Staff member
Good eating Cooter: A soft shelled turtle still served by the Yearling Restaurant inCross Creek.
Not to be confused with Scrub Chicken: Gopher tortoises. Crackers loved to eat them; now it is illegal to kill them.

Other cool words that are still being used by Florida Crackers include:




  • Chitlins: Hog innards, cleaned and cooked.

    Corn Pone: A cake made from cornmeal batter using milk instead of water and deep fried.

    Cracker Horse: A small horse descended from the herds that the Spaniards brought over in the early 1500's. They evolved into surefooted herding animals used by the Florida cowhunters.
    Croker Sack: A burlap bag.
    Fat Back: Fatty meat from a hog's back. Cut up in small pieces to flavor beans and greens. Also used to make lard. Also can be roasted crispy and eaten like popcorn.
    Grits: This is a southern staple made from dry coarse ground corn. Never served as a cereal, and not hominy grits Yankees eat. The Civil War would have ended much sooner if the Confederate Army had run out of grits.
    Hominy: Whole grains of white corn soaked in lye and boiled.
    Perloo: A one dish meal of meat and rice cooked together, like shrimp perloo. Yankees call it pilau. Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings has her favorite perloo recipe in her "Cross Creek Cookbook".

    Pineywoods Rooter: A feral hog, good to eat. Crackers like to trap them, pen them and fatten them up with corn before killing them for food.Pull: To take a drink of liquor from a bottle or jug. As in "take a pull of this shine".
    Swamp Cabbage: The heart of Sabal palm, cut into chunks and boiled. A cracker delicacy.

    Varmit: Any small animal like a rat, rabbit, or other varmint or vermin.
Touché on the clarification.
 

Mamabear

Well-known member
Pineywoods Rooter: A feral hog, good to eat. Crackers like to trap them, pen them and fatten them up with corn before killing them for food.

The reason for catching instead of killing is the flavor, not the "fatten up". The flavor of wild game that eat a lot of acorns tend to be.............. not so good. :)
 
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