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WOW! Amazing!

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Amazing, well sorta...

Basically, just fun.


Don't delete this
just because it looks weird. Believe it or not, you can read
it.



I cdnuolt blveiee
taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The
phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at
Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the
ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the
first and last ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a
taotl mses and you can still raed it wouthit a porbelm. This
is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by
istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh?

 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member

Speaking of "toothpicks"...they must last forever...just this past week I used the last of the toothpicks I had to hold the saran-type wrap up off of a frozen Smart Ones* meal that I had added a bit of shredded mozzarella cheese too so it wouldn't stick to the cheese. As I threw the empty toothpick box in the trash I noticed the box had a price sticker on it. The price sticker was from the Fort Bragg commissary. I was last at Fort Bragg in February 1989. Since then I have moved/lived in five (5) different places (4) of them in Louisiana and the final one here in Arkansas). That box of toothpicks lasted for 31 years and the box was still intact and the toothpicks just as new looking as they were all those years ago. The price of those toothpicks was .08¢.

*
smart one.jpg

I love this meal, it makes a great lunch with a bit of added mozzarella cheese.
 

sundealer

Founder
I had the same feeling about a roll of wax paper!!

2017 ·

After many years, at least 17, many moves, 7, 3 different states, it's with a sad heart I have to announce the end of the roll

1wax.jpg
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
I had the same feeling about a roll of wax paper!!

2017 ·

After many years, at least 17, many moves, 7, 3 different states, it's with a sad heart I have to announce the end of the roll

View attachment 15761
Gosh, I don’t think I have used waxed papers in at least decades. I can’t even remember how we used waxed paper. I do remember that in my early adult years I always had it on hand. I have never been much of a baker and I think that might be when it’s mostly used.
 

sundealer

Founder
Before baggies, Mom wrapped our sandwiches in it for school.
I use it to separate homemade burgers before freezing.
I remember using it to press flowers.
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Before baggies, Mom wrapped our sandwiches in it for school.
I use it to separate homemade burgers before freezing.
I remember using it to press flowers.
Ah so! Thanx for the walk down memory lane. I knew we used waxed paper in the distant past, I just couldn't remember all the ways...I do recall placing it on top of bowls and securing with a rubber band before placing the "leftovers" in the fridge (this was before the common use of inexpensive plastic storage containers and when Tupperware wasn't in the reach of young military folks' finances0. And I know that people who baked cookies (not me of course) used it to put the cookies on to continue cooling after removing from the cookie sheet.
 

sundealer

Founder
And I know that people who baked cookies (not me of course) used it to put the cookies on to continue cooling after removing from the cookie sheet.
Are sure it wasn’t parchment paper?
Wax paper melts!

Another use: in between layers of Christmas cookies in the tin!
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Are sure it wasn’t parchment paper?
Wax paper melts!

Another use: in between layers of Christmas cookies in the tin!
Could have been, I am not a cookie baker beyond the very few times I did the Pillsbury slice and bake method. I purchased my very first roll of parchment paper during the last Christmas season as I did make a couple of batches of chocolate bark and the pretzel/Rolo candy things and the recipes said to bake them on parchment-lined cookie pans.
 

KathyInAR

Founder
Staff member
Oh my goodness! When we first starting allowing our son to be left at home alone for short periods of time (aged around 11 or 12); there were three absolute rules: 1) No one allowed inside, So there was no conspiracy to get into trouble; 2) No turning on the stove, so there would be no burns or fires ; and, 3) no climbing up on anything, so there would be no falling and broken bones.

This little kid is cooking fried rice over an open flame...he looks like he couldn’t be but around 4 years old.

 
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